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PD HS 9th Grade Asian History Research Project: Annotation Bibliography Instructions

Mao's Legacy

Annotated Bibliography Instructions

Major Summative Task:      

Step 1: Develop a research question together with sub-questions.

Step 2: Prepare an annotated bibliography that identifies and evaluates sources to be used to answer the question(s).

What is an annotated bibliography?

According to the Cornell University Library, an annotated bibliography is a list of sources that is followed by a brief description and evaluation of the source. The purpose of the annotation is to inform the reader of the relevance and validity of the sources cited.

How do I write an annotated Bibliography?

  1. State your research question and sub-questions.
    1. Your research question must be relevant, specific, and clearly stated.
    2. Sub-questions must break down the research question to be answered logically.
  2. For each source found, cite it using MLA format. Cross check your MLA citation with Purdue Online Writing Lab (https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/)
  3. In 6-8 sentences, annotate your source by:
    1. Summarize it.
    2. Make connections: explain how the resource helps to answer the research question and/or sub-questions.
    3. Validity: evaluate the value and limitations of of the source using the CRAAP test.
  4. Use a range of appropriate and relevant sources, minimum of five sources (books, library database, websites, etc.)

RUBRIC

Criteria

Limited

Developing

Proficient

Exemplary

Research Proposal

The work does not reach a standard described to the right. 

A question for investigation has been stated.

- An general question for investigation is clearly stated

- an attempt has been made to break it down into sub-questions.

- An appropriate, specific question for investigation is clearly stated

- broken down into appropriate sub-questions.

MLA Conventions

The work does not reach a standard described to the right. 

Citations lack sufficient information or are only generally consistent with MLA.

Citations are mostly consistent with MLA.

Citations are consistent with MLA.

Variety of sources

The work does not reach a standard described to the right. 

Limited attempt to show range or few sources are appropriate.

Attempts to include a range of appropriate sources.

 

Includes a range of appropriate sources

  • different types
  • varied perspectives.

Connection

The work does not reach a standard described to the right.

Vague or inaccurate explanation of how the sources are connected to the research question.

General explanation describing how the sources are connected to the research question.

 

Clear explanation detailing how the sources are connected to the research question.

Evaluating

Validity

(CRAAP)

The work does not reach a standard described to the right.

- Describes elements of the source related to validity.

- General evaluation of the sources’ validity

- attempts to address both the value and limitations

- Clear, detailed analysis and evaluation of the sources’ validity

- Clear discussion of the value and limitations of the source.

 

Sample Annotated Bibliography

Research Question:

To what extent was the Cuban Missile Crisis a turning point in the Cold War?

Sub-questions:

  1. What was the Cold war?
  2. What was the Cuban Missile Crisis?
  3. What was Cuba’s role in the Cold War?
  4. How was the Soviet Union involved in the Cuban Missile Crisis?
  5. How were the people of Cuba/the US/ and USSR effected by the CMC?
  6. Why would an event be considered a turning point in an international conflict?
  7. Why could the Cuban Missile Crisis be considered a turning point?
  8. What is the evidence that the CMC was a turning point?

Example:

Lechuga, Carlos. Cuba and the Missile Crisis. Ocean, 2001. 

This source is a book called Cuba and the Missile Crisis written in 2001 by Carlos Lechuga. The value of this source is derived from its origin as Carlos Lechuga was the Cuban Ambassador to the United Nations in the 1960s, the timeframe in which the Cuban Missile Crisis occurred. This means that he would have firsthand experience on the dealings of this crisis and the reasons for the events that took place. It also means he will have an especially in-depth knowledge on the mindset of the Cubans during this Crisis. However, the fact that Carlos Lechuga is Cuban and a former Cuban Ambassador to the UN could also be a potential limitation of this source, as his views may portray America in a negative way and Cuba in a more positive light. Also, the fact that he did not write this book until 2001 means that he could have been influenced by the things that have happened since, and also may not be remembering things completely accurately as they happened such a long time before.