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Historical Perspective of "To Kill a Mockingbird": Great Depression

8th Grade Human Rights Novel Study. Getting a historical perspective.

Great Depression

Great Depression Info

No decade in the 20th century was more terrifying for people throughout the world than the 1930s. The traumas of the decade included economic disorder, the rise of totalitarianism, and the coming (or presence) of war. Nevertheless, the decade is remembered in different ways in different parts of the world. For people in the United States, the 1930s was indelibly the age of the Great Depression. Bank panics destroyed faith in the economic system, and joblessness limited faith in the future. The worst drought in modern American history struck the Great Plains in 1934. Windstorms that stripped the topsoil from millions of acres turned the whole area into a vast Dust Bowl and destroyed crops and livestock in unprecedented amounts. As a result, some 2.5 million people fled the Plains states, many bound for California, where the promise of sunshine and a better life often collided with the reality of scarce, poorly paid work as migrant farm labourers.

Citation Link "Great Depression." Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 28 Oct. 2017. school.ebonline.com/levels/high/article/Great-Depression/37849. Accessed 20 Mar. 2018.

The Article has many short video links

GREAT DEPRESSION Video

Video LInk -  https://school.ebonline.com/levels/high/assembly/view/18880

 

African Americans during the Great Depression

Impact of the Great Depression on African Americans

The Great Depression brought mass suffering to all regions of the country. National income dropped by 50 percent and unemployment rose to an estimated 25 percent of the total labor force. At the same time, twenty million Americans turned to public and private relief agencies for assistance. As the "Last Hired and the First Fired," African Americansentered the Depression long before the stock market crash in 1929, and they stayed there longer than other Americans. By 1933, African Americans found it all but impossible to find jobs of any kind in agriculture or industry. As cotton prices dropped from eighteen cents per pound on the eve of the Depression to less that six cents per pound in 1933, some 12,000 black sharecroppers lost their precarious footing in southern agriculture and moved increasingly toward southern, northern, and western cities. Mechanical devices had already slowly reduced the number of workers required for plowing, hoeing, and weeding, but now planters also experimented with mechanical cotton pickers, which displaced even more black farm workers. Despite declining opportunities in cities, the proportion of blacks living in urban areas rose from 44 percent in 1930 to nearly 50 percent by the onset of World War II.

Citation Link - TROTTER, JOE W. "African Americans, Impact of the Great Depression on." Encyclopedia of the Great Depression, edited by Robert S. McElvaine, vol. 1, Macmillan Reference USA, 2004, pp. 8-17. U.S. History in Context, http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/CX3404500017/UHIC?u=ingl29443&xid=97ff0ee6. Accessed 21 Mar. 2018.

Citation Link - TROTTER, JOE W. "African Americans, Impact of the Great Depression on." Encyclopedia of the Great Depression, edited by Robert S. McElvaine, vol. 1, Macmillan Reference USA, 2004, pp. 8-17. U.S. History in Context, http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/CX3404500017/UHIC?u=ingl29443&xid=97ff0ee6. Accessed 21 Mar. 2018.