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Puxi Hub Library Guide: Equity & Justice

The Sustainable Development Goals

SDG 4: Quality Education

SDG 5: Gender Equality

SDG 10: Reduced Inequality

SDG 16: Peace, Justice & Strong Institutions

Infographics

SDG 4: Quality Education

SDG 5: Gender Equality

Statistic: Do you advocate and support equal opportunities for women - not just in thought but also in word and action? | Statista
Find more statistics at Statista

SDG 10: Reduced Inequality

SDG 16: Peace, Justice & Strong Institutions

Videos

SDG 4: Quality Education

SDG 5: Gender Equality

SDG 10: Reduced Inequality

SDG 16: Peace, Justice & Strong Institutions

Library Books

PeaceJam

The Dalai Lama, the Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Costa Rican president Oscar Arias and political rights activist Aung San Suu Kyi are just some of the Nobel Peace Laureates who have joined the PeaceJam Foundation in their Global Call to Action. This book profiles all of these laureates and their work with teens around the world as they combine forces to help stop the spread of disease, promote women's rights, provide equitable access to food and water, and more. Combining profiles of the laureates? including personal bios'heartwarming tales of the youth and their projects, and tips on how readers can get involved, this is a comprehensive guide to the PeaceJam Foundation. Both humbling and inspiring, PeaceJam: A Billion Simple Acts of Peace is sure to excite anyone who picks it up to think about simple ways to help make our world a better place.

Equality and Diversity

Equality is having the same rights, opportunities, and status as everyone else. Diversity is about recognizing the importance of different cultures in society, while still protecting their equality. This timely book discusses why the acceptance of diversity is important in society to prevent discrimination based on race, religion, and sex. Case studies of real-world events help readers understand the consequences of inequality.

Because I Am a Girl

Rosemary McCarney, President and CEO of Plan International Canada, has followed up the her popular picture book Every Day is Malala Day with a book for middle grade readers, also inspired by her international development work. Working with Plan, Rosemary helped craft its Because I am a Girl global initiative to end gender inequality, promote girls' rights, and lift millions of girls out of poverty, and helped lead the charge for the United Nations to declare October 11th the "International Day of the Girl" - a day each year to recognize and advocate for girls' rights globally. This book illustrates the Because I am a Girl call to change by telling the stories of individual girls throughout the world. They tell us: "Because I am a girl, I eat if there is food left over when everyone is done" and "I am the poorest of the poor." The later stories are about hope, with chapters like "Because I am a girl, I will share what I know" and " I am the heart of my community" and "I can change the world." Illustrated with Plan's amazing photographs and including "Did You Know" fact sections.

How Can I Be an Ally?

Race in America has been avoided in children's education for too long. How Can I Be an Ally? explores the idea of how people can use their privilege to advance the culture of inclusion in a comprehensive, honest, and age-appropriate way. Developed in conjunction with educator, advocate, and author Kelisa Wing to reach children of all races and encourage them to approach race issues with open eyes and minds. Includes 21st Century Skills and content, as well as a PBL activity across the Racial Justice in America series. Also includes a table of contents, glossary, index, author biography, sidebars, educational matter, and activities.

Search for Peace

Describes the formation of the United Nations & discusses the difficulties the organization has faced in its efforts to maintain peace.

UNICEF and Other Human Rights Efforts

Why Do We Fight?

Battles, protests, standoffs, strikes. We hear about them all the time. On the surface, a battle and a protest don't seem to have much in common, but they're really just two ways of handling a dispute. One uses violence, the other uses signs and picket lines. But both start as a disagreement between two groups of people. Both are conflicts. Since it's impossible for people to agree on everything all the time, conflicts naturally pop up every day, all over the world. Sometimes they turn into full-blown wars, which can be a lot trickier to understand than the conflicts that pop up in everyday life, but every conflict has some things in common. Using real world examples, Why Do We Fight?teaches kids to recognize the structures, factors, and complex histories that go into creating conflicts, whether personal or global -- as well as the similarities between both. They'll be given tools to seek out information, enabling them to make informed opinions while learning to respect that others may form different ones. From culture clashes and trade disputes to disagreements about how to govern, Why Do We Fight?insists that the key to fulfilling humankind's wish for "world peace" lies in how we choose to deal with conflict and provides a genuine cause for optimism in the face of an at-times frightening world.

Education for All

In a perfect world, every child would receive a quality education in safe and peaceful surroundings. In the real world, hundreds of millions of children in villages, towns, and big cities never learn to read and write. Some because their nation is torn by war; others -- especially girls -- because of prejudice. And still others because they live in remote and wild places. That's the bad news. The good news is that people dedicated to achieving Education for All are joining forces to bring schooling to these millions of children. This book in Ron Fridell's In A Perfect World series takes a close look at the backpacking teachers, tent schools, floating schools, Internet classrooms, and community-based programs springing up in cities and remote villages around the world to provide Education for All. Book jacket.

Girl Rising

A gorgeous, full-color oversized book about educating girls across the world inspired by the documentary that Entertainment Weekly says "every mother, sister, daughter, should see, as well as the men who love and support them." This is the right book for the present moment and perfect for fans of inspirational nonfiction such as I Am Malala and anyone who believes that one girl can change the world. Worldwide, over 130 million girls are not in school. But one girl with courage is a revolution.  Girl Rising, a global campaign for girls' education, created a film that chronicled the stories of nine girls in the developing world, allowing viewers the opportunity to witness how education can break the cycle of poverty. Now, award-winning author Tanya Lee Stone deftly uses new research to illuminate the dramatic facts behind the film, focusing both on the girls captured on camera and many others. She examines barriers to education in depth--early child marriage and childbearing, slavery, sexual trafficking, gender discrimination, and poverty--and shows how removing these barriers means not only a better life for girls, but safer, healthier, and more prosperous communities.  With full-color photos from the film, infographics, and a compelling narrative, Girl Rising will inspire readers of all ages to join together in a growing movement to help change the world. A Junior Library Guild Selection  Bank Street Best Children's Books of the Year "A moving account of hardships and triumphs that is bound to inspire future activists, this is a devastating but crucial read." --Kirkus Reviews, Starred   Additional Praise for the Film:  "Delivers . . . tangible hope that the world can be healed in a better future." --Meryl Streep "Girl Rising stands as a testament to the power of information." --The Los Angeles Times

Education Equality

The 2019 college admissions scandal in the United States, where more and 50 people were involved in a $25 million dollar bribery scheme, brought the issue of equality and equity in education to public attention in a shocking way. But education equality is about more than college admissions. This thoughtful book examines the issue of public education, education equality, and the education system's role in helping students reach their full potential for the good of all.

Let Me Play

Can girls play softball? Can girls be school crossing guards? Can girls play basketball or ice hockey or soccer? Can girls become lawyers or doctors or engineers? Of course they can... today. But just a few decades ago, opportunities for girls were far more limited, not because they weren't capable of playing or didn't want to become doctors or lawyers, but because they weren't allowed to. Then quietly, in 1972, something momentous happened: Congress passed a law called "Title IX," forever changing the lives of American girls. Hundreds of determined lawmakers, teachers, parents, and athletes carefully plotted to ensure that the law was passed, protected, and enforced. Time and time again, they were pushed back by ├×erce opposition. But as a result of their perseverance, millions of American girls can now play sports. Young women make up half of the nation's medical and law students, and star on the best basketball, soccer, and softball teams in the world. This small law made a huge difference. From the Sibert Honor-winning author of Six Days in October comes this powerful tale of courage and persistence, the stories of the people who believed that girls could do anything -- and were willing to fight to prove it. A Junior Library Guild Selection